How to Handle “i.e.” and “e.g”

When i.e. or e.g. are used, they introduce a renaming of what was just said. How they are punctuated depends upon where they are in the sentence and what follows them. When they are at the end of the sentence… When followed by a fragment, use a pair of commas. …was following the red car, i.e., the Ford… …including a …

“Than I” versus “Then Me”

I have been on Facebook a couple of times in the last couple of days and am seeing away too much of then instead of than! When there is a comparison word — that would be the word more or an “-er” on the end of a word — you want to use the word than. The word then, which …

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“I Wish I Were…”

The use of the word were in this construction is fading from our language as people do not understand the correctness of it. This construction is called “contrary-to-fact” subjunctive. It is a situation in which one wishes for something that is not true. …I wish I were able to attend (but I cannot)… …I wish he were here with me …

“Than” and “Then”

When there is a comparison, the word you want is than, not then. …harder than I thought… …smoother than the last one… …acts better than she… …performed better than he did the last time… More and more, we are seeing the word then in this pattern — taller then John — just wrong, wrong, wrong!!! Then means “next” or “at …

Capping the Words for the Directions

The words for the directions — north, south, east, west — and any “combined” forms of those are capped when they represent a “recognized” geographical area. There are those we would all recognize. …lived in South America for a while… …visited the North Pole… …vacationed in the South of France… …moved to Northern California… These words are not capped when …

Single Separating Comma after “And”

This question keeps coming up. When you have a coordinate conjunction — and, but, or, nor — there is never a single comma by itself after it. You might want to surround something after a coordinate conjunction, but there is not a single comma. No matter how long the pause after these words nor how much the word is drawn …

“Anymore” versus “Any More”

As one word, anymore means “from this time forward, from now on.” …don’t like him anymore… …will not go there anymore… When it is any more, two words, the word more means “additional.” Two words, any more means “anything/anyone additional.” …don’t need any more to do… …didn’t see any more that have to be dealt with… Happy punctuating! Margie