A Follow-Up! “Anytime” and “Any Time”

We had a discussion over on FB about this sentence: …Jump in anytime/any time you like. “Anytime” means “an indefinite point in time” as in a moment in time. …You can do that anytime. …I can meet you anytime tomorrow. “Any time” means “an indefinite period of time” as in a span of time. …I don’t have any time today. …

Some Thoughts for “Sometime” and “Some Time”

“Sometime” is an indefinite POINT in time; “some time” is an indefinite PERIOD of time. If you are thinking of “1:15” or “2:30,” it is one word; if you are thinking of “seven hours” or “ten minutes,” it is two words. …Give me a call sometime/some time next week. Are you thinking of giving him a call at 3:30 or …

“Who” versus “Whom”

Not a lot of people are really interested in this anymore, but here it is! There are two reasons that people have trouble with who and whom. The first reason is that one does not hear these used correctly. Have you heard the word whom used this week? this month? We have simply lost the correct use of these words. …

The Compound Sentence

I am going to start this topic today and will keep coming back to it over the next weeks. The question is what to do with an element that begins a second sentence after an and or but (or, nor). One of the basic reasons to have punctuation is to sort out the structure of the sentence. Cardinal Rule No. …

…don’t mean “will” will…

As long as I have been in this field, I have never been asked this question until recently — and it has come up at least ten times in the past six months! Weird. What do we do with this? …I don’t mean “will” will. …He isn’t really “right” right. The first word is in the category of a word …

I am back!!

It has been a rough couple of months. I think things have settled down. So my blogs are back. Stay tuned right here for information on “All Things English.” Just a quick one here: When transcribing email addresses and URL’s, I recommend that you transcribe them exactly as they look as an email address or a URL, that is, no …