Percentages

Percentages are always in figures and are never hyphenated as adjectives. …A 72 percent increase is excessive. …I disagree with the 4 percent figure. Happy punctuating! Margie

Tag Clauses

A recent FB answer to why the first kind of tag clauses take a comma and why there cannot be a comma before the word “right” by itself. “Didn’t you’ and “has he” echo the words of the question. They are a shortened form of the question.   …He was there early, wasn’t he [there early]? …She was not the …

One More Time…

What do we do with “…my son Scott…?” Comma or not? This is the “essential/nonessential” dilemma, the hardest concept in all of punctuation. I would suggest that you read the entire chapter in my book on this. It is Chapter 4. The rule is very difficult to condense into a few sentences. When I explain it, it is about 30 …

Another Quote Issue

When a person repeats only a part of the original statement, quote only the part that was in the original. …to wait for a later to be discovered piece of evidence. Object to the foundation for that “later to be discovered” something… Happy punctuating. Margie

What Should We Do with Email Addresses?

The question arises about email addresses as to whether it is best to write what they actually say or whether to just use the email address in its regular format. He says, “It is mls, my initials; the symbol for at; the word revolutionbrakes, all jammed together; then dot com.” [And that is just a stab at punctuating that mess!] So you put that sentence into the …

Word Pairs Book to the Rescue…

Interesting error this morning in an article on the Internet — …”This Obama did not demure from the fact that mass incarceration and sexual violation in prison that have become such accepted feature….” Check out my word pairs book on “demur/demure.” Happy punctuating! Margie

Exhibit Numbers

Exhibit numbers are always in figures — even at the beginning of a sentence. The word “exhibit” is capped in front of the number. The word “number” is abbreviated as “No.”; the plural is “Nos.” …THE COURT:    This will be Exhibit No. 4. …MS. RAY:          4. Okay. …We have marked this as Exhibit 9. Happy punctuating! …

The Word “Though”

The word “though,” when it is alone in the middle of the sentence, is surrounded by commas. …I think he knew, though, that this was the end. …He was standing, though, near the door. At the end of the sentence, it takes a comma in front of it. …He was leaning against it, though. …I didn’t really understand it, though. …