Link for the Free Class on Commas

Here is the link for the class for tomorrow night: margieholdscourt.teachable.com. You should be able to register for the class at this link. Happy punctuating! Margie

Adding the Suffix “-wise”

The rule for adding suffixes is to add them directly to the word to form a solid word. The suffix –wise normally follows this rule. …We placed it lengthwise along the edge. …Otherwise, he will not be able to complete it. This suffix, however, gets added to some words where it was never intended: punctuationwise, doctorwise. How do these words …

Jim Barker on Whether or Not to Quote

Jim Barker, September of 2014, was asked this question: “Do you quote when you can’t see the quoted material and you don’t know if they really read it verbatim?” Jim’s response: “Absolutely. And why is that? Because, when a reporter quotes a speaker who is reading from a document, the reporter is not quoting the words in the ‘document’; the …

That Pesky Word “So”

One more time… The word so is normally an adverb. …I was so very tired that night. …He was so cranky at the end of the day.   It can also be a conjunction.   It can be the kind of conjunction that starts a dependent clause and is then a subordinate conjunction (like “because,” “since,” “as,” “before,” “unless.”) There …

You Cannot “Talk” in Run-Ons

Some people have been making this statement: “The attorney just keeps talking in run-ons.” He said, “We were together, AND she seemed to be distracted, BUT I didn’t say anything to her at the time. AND it was beginning to be irritating, BUT I didn’t want to cause a scene.” When people go on and on and decide to insert …

“Keep-Togethers”

Compound words are best kept together on the same line. If the word is real estate or high school, it is best that the first word not be on one line and the second word on the next line. It is best to leave the ZIP code with the state and to leave the time figure with the word o’clock. …