“Yes” and “No” and Their Friends

Margie Wakeman Wells The Quotation Mark, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

When “yes” and “no” are being used generically, there are no quotes. That is, when they are being used to refer to a positive or negative answer, they are not quoted. Attorneys are generally looking for a generic response and are not requiring that those words and only those words be used. When the “yes” and “no” are mixed in …

Court Reporting Summer School Is Here!

Justin Baker MWW Blog Leave a Comment

How long has it been since you went to summer school? I am sure you loved it! So Margie Holds Court is bringing it back! “Court Reporting Summer School” Three classes between now and the end-of-September CEU deadline. Choices galore! Can’t make it to the NOLA convention? Here are your CEU choices, and it is sooooo much cheaper!! No airfare, …

The Word “Whelm”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

I get a word every day from Merriam-Webster — it is free. You might want to sign up for it. I just found this word intriguing — “whelm.” I am sure I have never used the word without a prefix. Here are the three definitions given: to turn (something, such as a dish or vessel) upside down usually to cover …

Birthday Sale

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

  My birthday is next week. They are all big these days! To celebrate, we are having a book sale. Order from the bookstore on www.margieholdscourt.com. CR: Bad Grammar/Good Punctuation 10 percent off. Discount code: HBDMARGIECR Buy this text in combination with the Workbook or Word Pears, Pares, Pairs 15 percent off. Discount code: HBDMARGIECOMBO Hurry. The sale ends at midnight …

More on Hyphenation

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

There are some hyphenation questions that fall into a “gray” area. This is the method I would try when you are in doubt — or maybe when you just want to figure it out. …sunny breakfast room First, it is a room. Then, it is a breakfast room. Last, it is a breakfast room that is sunny. If this works, …

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

I know we have done this before but… Distinguishing “awhile/a while” need not continue to be an issue. As one word, “awhile” is an adverb; as two words, “a while” is a noun. Each means “for an indefinite period of time.” There are some contexts that demand that it be two words, that is, that call for a noun. …in …

“That Is…” and Others

Margie Wakeman Wells The Colon, The Comma, The Dash, The Semicolon Leave a Comment

This is an abbreviated version of what is in my book on these eight parentheticals. PARENTHETICAL TO INTRODUCE AN APPOSITIVE Sometimes, when a person wants to explain, reiterate, rename, or restate something — that is, he wants to use an appositive — he uses a parenthetical before the appositive. These are the expressions most commonly used as parentheticals before an …

What about…? How about…?

Margie Wakeman Wells The Question Mark Leave a Comment

“What about…?” and “How about…?” are idiomatic expressions that are meant to ask a question. It is true that they are not grammatically complete sentences in that they do not have a verb. However, idioms are unique unto themselves, and these two indicate questions and must stand alone with a question mark. If there is a question after this expression, …