After “Yes” and “No”

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma 2 Comments

Let’s keep it simple: If the words after “yes” and “no” echo/repeat the words of the question, use a comma. …Did you clock in that morning as usual? …Yes, I did. …No, I did not. …Were you with your brother? …Yes, I was with my brother. …No, I wasn’t. Use a period for everything else. …Did you clock in that …

A Few Hyphen Issues

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen 4 Comments

When a word ends in -ly, do not hyphenate it to the word after it. …poorly constructed edifice… …newly build condos… …recently deceased partner… Though the suffix -wise should be added to the word and made a solid word, this leads to some very strange-looking words. …punctuationwise, what do you… …made the decision doctorwise… It might be best in these …

The Problem with “Affect” and “Effect”

Margie Wakeman Wells General 2 Comments

We don’t need to worry about the word affect, when it is pronounced with the short a. First, there is no problem “hearing” the a and therefore getting the right word. It is the psychiatric term that refers to the outward manifestation of subjective feelings. Similarly, the word affectation is not a problem. He had a noticeably flat affect. It …

Letter-for-Letter Spelling

Margie Wakeman Wells General 5 Comments

When you are doing letter-for-letter spelling, there are some basic things to keep in mind: 1. The hyphen goes with the letter AFTER it. …I believe it is -f-f-e? …Jasmine, J-a-s, as in “Sam,” -m-i-n-e. SECOND EXAMPLE: –There is no hyphen after the s in the spelling. –Notice the pattern for a word that is used as an example. It …

Greetings from Florida

Margie Wakeman Wells General, The Apostrophe 3 Comments

Just checking in from Sarasota, Florida. Off to Clearwater this afternoon for the Florida Court Reporters Association convention this weekend. Hope to meet some of you there. Just wondering what you are all thinking about “Bachelor’s degree” and the rest in the category. It has to be apostrophe s, but what about the cap? I think it should be there …

The Story of “Whereas” and “Although”

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma 2 Comments

So often we see whereas and although incorrectly punctuated with a semicolon in front and a comma after as in …was seen with him; although, she did not… …was seen with him; whereas, she did not…. This punctuation implies that these words are conjunctions (conjunctive adverbs) that start a new sentence. Instead, whereas and although are conjunctions (subordinate conjunctions) that …

About that Intro Prepositional Phrase

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, Uncategorized 2 Comments

Here is one of the questions asked about the intro prepositional phrase and the comma, and here is my answer. We were talking about a short prepositional phrase at the beginning of the sentence that is a simple modifier. That prepositional phrase does not need a comma. What about those instances where a short prepositional [phrase] at the beginning of …