“My Question Is…”

This construction always causes consternation and no end of disagreement. This is my understanding of the way English grammar works. It is never correct to use a single separating comma between the verb and the predicate nominative. Surely no one wants a comma in the following examples. …My name is Margie. …Her response is that she was not home. …My …

A Period or a Question Mark?

When the witness repeats the question or part of the question and then answers it, use a question mark after the question and let the rest of the answer stand on its own. …Q   Was it after 10:00 that he called that night? …A    Was it after 10:00? Yes. …Q   What was the attire for the meeting? …

Two Questions

Even when said as one thought with NO pause and NO change of the timbre of the voice, this construction takes two question marks.   …Were your car windows open? Do you remember? …Was your radio on? Do you know?   Reversing the subject and verb in English is the indication that there is a question. These are questions — …

“Where are you going? is my question.”

When there are two parts to a sentence, one a statement and one a question, it is the part at the end that determines the terminal punctuation. …My question is where are you going? …Where are you going? is my question. In the second example, since the sentence ends in a period, there has to be a question mark mid-sentence …

Quotes

Periods and commas go inside quotes without exception; colons and semicolons go outside quotes without exception. Question marks go inside or outside quotes depending on where the question is being asked: If there is a question inside the quotes, the question mark goes inside; if there is no question inside the quotes but there is one outside, the question mark …