Put the Interrog Where the Question Is First Asked

Margie Wakeman Wells The Question Mark, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

First, when the situation is that the attorney has asked a question, using question word order and then does not just keep quiet and get his answer but goes on to clarify, restate, et cetera, we have a problem. How do we handle “multiple” questions within the same question?   I would propose that we adopt a rule that uses …

When “What” Is at the End

Margie Wakeman Wells The Question Mark, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

…You were a what? A supervisor? …It was a what? A Toyota? My contention is that these questions are just turned around from what they should be. Instead of “What were you?” and “What was it?” the order is reversed. It is just bad grammar (to which we apply good punctuation). Whenever the question comes up, there is a tendency …

The Indirect Question

Margie Wakeman Wells The Question Mark Leave a Comment

The indirect question always occurs in a dependent clause and never has question word order, i.e., never reverses the subject and verb. The indirect question takes a period. …I want to know where you were. Direct question would be “Where were you?” …I am asking about how long it took. Direct question would be “How long did it take?” …My …

Put the Question Mark Where the Question Is First Asked

Margie Wakeman Wells The Question Mark Leave a Comment

We need a rule to cover all of the things attorneys do after they ask that basic question. This is the pattern that came up in four different questions on FB. …Do you know where he is right now? because that is going to make a difference. …Do you want to take a break right now? because we are starting …

“i.e.” and Its Friends, Part 2

Margie Wakeman Wells The Question Mark Leave a Comment

These eight expressions are often used when something is being renamed or reiterated: i.e., that is, e.g., for example, to wit, namely, for instance, in other words The punctuation depends upon where they are in the sentence and/or what follows them. There are six rules; so we will do a few at a time. AFTER A QUESTION Use a question …