The Adverb That Gets Bumped up to Conjunction

Margie Wakeman Wells General, The Comma, The Semicolon 2 Comments

Sometimes an adverb gets pulled out to the beginning of a sentence to form a “bridge” to the sentence before it. It becomes a linking word for the two sentences and shows a relationship between the two sentences. This is called a conjunctive adverb. Some examples are however, moreover, nevertheless, therefore, still, thus, yet, then Generally there is a comma …

“i.e.” and Its Friends

Margie Wakeman Wells The Colon, The Comma, The Semicolon Leave a Comment

These eight expressions are often used when something is being renamed or reiterated: i.e., that is, e.g., for example, to wit, namely, for instance, in other words The punctuation depends upon where they are in the sentence and/or what follows them. There are six rules; so we will do a few at a time. WHEN THESE WORDS AND WHAT FOLLOWS …

Parallel Construction and the Semicolon

Margie Wakeman Wells The Semicolon Leave a Comment

…I arrived on Saturday; he arrived on Sunday. …He resigned in 2010; she resigned in 2011. …The first train leaves at 5:00 A.M.; the last train leaves at 10:00 P.M. The Rule: When two sentences have NO conjunction between them and have parallel grammatical construction, use a semicolon between them. This question always arises: Could I use a period? My …

The Adverb Being Used as a Conjunction

Margie Wakeman Wells The Semicolon Leave a Comment

This one is from an answer on Facebook to the question of what punctuation these sentences need: …He worked late on Friday; so he couldn’t attend the party. …She approached the intersection cautiously; then she came to a complete stop. “So” and “then” are, by nature, adverbs.…was so excited……to then see what was happening…When these adverbs are pulled out to …

The Word “So” — Again

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, The Semicolon 7 Comments

We continue to struggle with this word “so” — so little and so much trouble!! When “so” means “in order that” and implies the reason for doing something, it is a subordinate conjunction that begins a dependent clause, and there is no punctuation. …walking slowly so I wouldn’t miss anything… …going to see her so I could give her the …

Those “Conjunctive Adverbs” Again

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, The Semicolon Leave a Comment

When certain adverbs are pulled out to the front of a sentence and are used to form a bridge — that is, show a relationship — between two sentences, they become conjunctions which we call conjunctive adverbs. Some of them are moreover, however, nevertheless, therefore, consequently thus, hence, yet, still, then, so (Here is where I would make the argument …