What Do I Do with…?

Margie Wakeman Wells General 4 Comments

Q     Do you know whether there were any left? A      No. And the attorney tries to clean up the mess he has created: Q      So “No,” you don’t know? Or, “No,” there weren’t any left?Since he is focusing on the word used, the quotes are correct. Since “no” stands for a complete thought, it is capped. You could use a …

Directions: “North,” “South,” “East,” “West”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

The rule for capping north, south, east, and west is that these words are capped when they represent a “recognized” geographical region and are not capped when they simply indicate direction. …He lives in the South. …He lives south of the intersection of Main and Broadway. So in California, if I say I am going to “Northern California” on vacation, you …

Directions with “North,” “South,” “East,” and “West”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

The direction words — “north,” “south,” “east,” and “west” — are capped when they refer to a recognized region and not capped when they simply indicate a direction.In CA, for example, we have “Northern CA” and “Southern CA” as recognized regions; we have no region that is recognized as “eastern CA.” …He lives in Northern California. …He lives in eastern …

A.M. and P.M.

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

When the question is “Was that A.M. or P.M.?” the problem with the way the answer looks is solved if you cap both letters. The dictionary gives you an option for caps or lowercase. Choosing caps all the time resolves any issues. Q   Was that A.M. or P.M.? A    A.M. Happy punctuating! Margie

Capping Titles in Front of the Name

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

A rule of thumb, perhaps: When trying to discern whether something is a “title” in front of a name, think of whether it sounds “normal and usual” to walk into a room and say, “Good morning, —–.” We would walk in and say, “Good morning, Doctor (Officer, Sergeant, Judge, Counsel).” These are titles. We would probably not walk in and …

Words for Directions

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

Remember that the words that represent directions — north, south, east, west — in any form are capitalized when they represent a recognized geographical area. This presumes that you might have to have some information about a region to know whether it is “recognized.” Here in Los Angeles, for example, people would recognize “West L.A.” and “East L.A.,” but we …

Capping the Words for the Directions

Margie Wakeman Wells Uncategorized 4 Comments

The words for the directions — north, south, east, west — and any “combined” forms of those are capped when they represent a “recognized” geographical area. There are those we would all recognize. …lived in South America for a while… …visited the North Pole… …vacationed in the South of France… …moved to Northern California… These words are not capped when …

Parties to the Lawsuit

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

These parties to the lawsuit — plaintiff, defendant, defense — are not capped in general context in the transcript. …spoke with plaintiff on the phone… …sent to the defense… …saw the defendant at the scene… These parties to the lawsuit — city, county, state, government — are capped in general context in the transcript. …accused the City of not maintaining …