The Word “Please”

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma Leave a Comment

The word please takes punctuation according to where it is in relation to what it modifies. At the beginning of what it modifies, it takes no punctuation after it. …Please put that notice into the bulletin. …Please state your name for the record. At the end of what it modifies, it takes a comma before it. …Put that notice into …

A “Redefining” with “That Is”

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, The Question Mark, The Semicolon, Uncategorized 3 Comments

Here is a punctuation question from FB that inspired today’s blog: “On examination her lower extremities had normal capillary refill — that is, normal circulation — and no trophic changes, in other words, none of the signs of RSD.” Often people want to redefine or further explain what they have just said. We will deal here with this situation when …

After “Yes” and “No”

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma 2 Comments

Let’s keep it simple: If the words after “yes” and “no” echo/repeat the words of the question, use a comma. …Did you clock in that morning as usual? …Yes, I did. …No, I did not. …Were you with your brother? …Yes, I was with my brother. …No, I wasn’t. Use a period for everything else. …Did you clock in that …

About that Intro Prepositional Phrase

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, Uncategorized 2 Comments

Here is one of the questions asked about the intro prepositional phrase and the comma, and here is my answer. We were talking about a short prepositional phrase at the beginning of the sentence that is a simple modifier. That prepositional phrase does not need a comma. What about those instances where a short prepositional [phrase] at the beginning of …

More on the Prepositional Phrase at the Beginning of the Sentence

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma 8 Comments

We said earlier that a short prepositional phrase at the beginning of a sentence that is just a simple modifier does NOT take a comma. Let’s look at what prepositional phrases do take a comma. RULE: Put a comma after a “long” prepositional phrase. (Though there is no set number of words to necessarily count, the dividing line is somewhere …