Adding the Suffix “-wise”

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen Leave a Comment

The rule for adding suffixes is to add them directly to the word to form a solid word. The suffix –wise normally follows this rule. …We placed it lengthwise along the edge. …Otherwise, he will not be able to complete it. This suffix, however, gets added to some words where it was never intended: punctuationwise, doctorwise. How do these words …

Jim Barker on Whether or Not to Quote

Margie Wakeman Wells The Quotation Mark 1 Comment

Jim Barker, September of 2014, was asked this question: “Do you quote when you can’t see the quoted material and you don’t know if they really read it verbatim?” Jim’s response: “Absolutely. And why is that? Because, when a reporter quotes a speaker who is reading from a document, the reporter is not quoting the words in the ‘document’; the …

P.S. on the Word “Number”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

When the word “number” and the number itself delineate an item in a list, it is best to write both of them out to avoid some confusing situations. …They were, number one, $243; number two, $867; and, number three, $674. …They were, No. 1, $243; No. 2, $867; and, No. 3, $674. The second one is just not easy to …

Clarifying Terminology

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma Leave a Comment

When we say, “Do not put a comma after ‘so,’” we are talking about a single separating comma. A pair of commas can go anywhere. There is never a single comma after “so.” We have this confusion often with this rule in several other contexts also. …So when did you join the company? …So, Mr. Anders, when did you join …