“Different From” or “Different Than”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

The word “than” always involves a comparison form — either an “er” on a word or the words “more” or “less.” It can only compare. …larger than that… …louder than I thought… …wiser than I… …more comfortable than that one… …more appropriate than what he said… …more suitable than what she chose… Since “different” has no comparison form, it has …

Upcoming CSR/RPR English Prep Class

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Need to brush up on English for an upcoming exam? Here is a five-hour review class, covering all of the salient points of grammar and punctuation with plenty of practice material — the first two Saturdays of May. More information and registration here: http://www.ccr.edu/index.php/component/content/article/43-loocs/437-cre301-csrrpr-english-review Happy punctuating! Margie

Spotting Dependent Clauses, Part 1…

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The difference between a dependent clause and a prepositional phrase is that the clause has a subject and a verb. …We will meet after dinner. (phrase) …We will meet after we eat. (clause) …I have not seen him since Friday. (phrase) …I have not seen him since we met in Barcelona. (clause) The difference between a dependent clause and an …

“The Reason Is…”

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Once you use the word “reason,” the words why, on account of, due to, because are all extraneous — and wrong! “Reason” is enough. …The reason is because he… NO! …The reason why is he… NO! …The reason is on account of his… NO! …The reason is due to his… NO! …The reason is I didn’t have the money. …The …

“Ought” Versus “Aught”

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When someone says the word “aught” meaning “zero,” it is spelled with an “a.” It is an old word that means “zero.” In the early 1900s, many people referenced those first years as “aught six,” transcribed “06.” There is an expression “for aught I care,” which today is most often said “for all I care.” It is never “ought.” Happy …

“Couldn’t Help But…”

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A little grammar for the day. Remember that “but” has to connect two equal things. Thus “I couldn’t help but think…” and “I couldn’t help but feel…” just doesn’t work. …I couldn’t help thinking… …I couldn’t help feeling… Happy punctuating! Margie

The Ever-Elusive Adverbial Objective

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There is something in English called an “adverbial objective.” It is a noun that answers an adverb question.…I will see you tomorrow.“Tomorrow” is a noun that in this sentence is answering “when,” an adverb question. Since part of speech is determined solely by usage, “tomorrow” is being used as an adverb and therefore is an adverb in this sentence, though …