Hyphenating Adjectives

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen Leave a Comment

Remember that the dictionary does not make a distinction for adjectives in regard to hyphenating. The dictionary gives the “direct adjective,” right in front of the noun, form only. So if you look up “long-range,” it is shown as hyphenated. This does not take into account that the RULE says that a predicate adjective is not hyphenated. …I have long-range plans. …My …

More on Hyphens

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

Remember that hyphenating words in front of a noun is done to indicate those words form a unit. …long-range plans… …old-fashioned ideas… …five-month-old baby… When the words are already considered to be a unit, no hyphen is required. This occurs with multiple-word compound nouns. …real estate transaction… …social security payments… …high school diploma… One trick for hyphens is to test whether the …

Letter-for-Letter Spelling

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

When a person is spelling a name, there are several rules that apply: The spelling looks exactly as the name looks when simply typed. …My name is James Edwards, J-a-m-e-s E-d-w-a-r-d-s. Leave spaces where there are spaces in the name. …My name is Mark Van Meter, V-a-n M-e-t-e-r. If someone says “cap” or “capped,” there are two choices: …My name …

The Prefix “Co-“

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen Leave a Comment

The rule is to add the prefix to the front of the word and make a solid word. The prefix “co-” has generally been an exception to this rule and has been hyphenated. I would say that it is “in transition.” That is, it is generally moving toward being made a solid word in many instances. The problem, as I …

“-ly” Words and Hyphens

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen Leave a Comment

Most of us know the rule “Do not hyphenate an ‘-ly’ word.” This rule perhaps need a little more definition. Do not hyphenate an adverb that ends in “-ly” to the word after it. …recently built homes… …highly regarded leaders… This does not apply when the “-ly” word is not an adverb. There are many “-ly” words that are adjectives. …twice-weekly appointments… …

“Full-Time”

Margie Wakeman Wells General, The Hyphen Leave a Comment

The dictionary shows full-time hyphenated as an adverb. …He works full-time. …She was there full-time. As an adjective, it follows the rules: Hyphenate it as a direct adjective; do not hyphenate it when it is not in front of the noun. …He has a full-time job. …His job is full time. Part-time follows these same rules. Happy punctuating! Margie

Apostrophe or Hyphen

Margie Wakeman Wells General, The Apostrophe, The Hyphen Leave a Comment

When there is a quantity, measurement, distance, value, amount that is expressed as a direct adjective (right in front of a noun) AND there is an “s” on the adjective, use an apostrophe “s” when it is singular and an “s” apostrophe when it is plural. …one minute’s delay …five minutes’ delay …one week’s vacation …two weeks’ vacation When there …

…Years Old

Margie Wakeman Wells The Hyphen Leave a Comment

If someone’s age is being described and there is no noun that is being modified, there are no hyphens. …He is five years old. …She is 55 years old. When the combination becomes a direct adjective (right in front of the noun), it is hyphenated. In this case, we say “year” instead of “years.” That does not make a difference …