Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

I know we have done this before but… Distinguishing “awhile/a while” need not continue to be an issue. As one word, “awhile” is an adverb; as two words, “a while” is a noun. Each means “for an indefinite period of time.” There are some contexts that demand that it be two words, that is, that call for a noun. …in …

“Into” versus “In To”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

There is an instance where either option works, depending upon what you want to say. If “work” is the physical place, “into” is one word; if “work” is the activity, then “in to” is two words. …He came into work. (the physical location) …He came in to work. (to do the job) Happy punctuating! Margie

“Sometime/Some Time”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

Some extra hints about the differences between one word and two: “Sometime” as an adjective means “occasional” or “here today/gone tomorrow.” …He is a sometime friend. “Some time” is an adjective and noun combination. “Time” is the noun. There are times when it has to be two words because the grammar calls for a noun. Here the word “time” is …

“Sometime/Some Time”

Margie Wakeman Wells General, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

  Often the grammar of the sentence determines the one-word/two-word difference for the word sometime. If it is the object of a preposition, it has to be two words. …for some time… …at some time… In these expressions, the word time is the main noun. You cannot say “ago” or “back” by themselves. So you need two words. …some time …

“Everyday” or “Every Day”?

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

As one word, everyday comes in front of a noun and means “ordinary,” “routine,” “habitual,” or “commonplace.” Otherwise, it is every day. …It is an everyday job. …She had those everyday tasks that drove her crazy. …I was there every day last week. …Will you do that every day? Happy punctuating! Margie

“Turn Into”

Margie Wakeman Wells General Leave a Comment

This particular phrase, turn into, is an idiom which means “to become.” …When he drinks, he turns into a monster. So with the word turn, unless the meaning is “to become,” in to has to be two words. …He turned in to the driveway. …He turned in to the roadway. But …He pulled into the driveway. …He pulled into the roadway. …

“A While” Is Always Okay!

Margie Wakeman Wells General 1 Comment

There is no need to be a quandary over awhile versus a while. It can always be two words. It has to be two words after a preposition and in “a while ago” and “a while back.” …there for a while… …called in a while… …saw him a while ago… …remember it from a while back… English has something called …