Quotes and the Words That Get Us Into Them

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, The Quotation Mark Leave a Comment

The term “lead-in words” is used to describe the words that introduce quotes. Traditionally they are …I said… …did he ask… …she replied… …did you state… Some of the “modern” innovations are “I go” and “he went” and “I’m all.” When there are two sentences separated by lead-in words, a period has to go on one side or the other …

Quotes and Caps

Margie Wakeman Wells The Quotation Mark Leave a Comment

The first word of a quote is capped if it starts a grammatically complete sentence or a fragment that stands for a complete thought. It is not capped if it is a fragment. …Q   When did you leave? …A    We left around 4:00. …Q   What do you mean “We left around 4:00”? …Q   When did you leave? …A   We left …

Awkward Quotes

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, The Quotation Mark 2 Comments

When someone chooses to switch into quotes after the word that, you just have no choice but to use quotation marks (despite the fact that your trusty English teacher told you never to use quotes after that). There is, however, no comma after the word that because it really doesn’t qualify as “lead-in” words. …She told me that I had …

Just Some Stuff This Morning

Margie Wakeman Wells Numbers, The Quotation Mark Leave a Comment

When someone says “quote/unquote,” use a slash mark in between the words. Surround them with appropriate punctuation. Use the quote marks also. When the attorney says “okay” before he starts a question — more or less a response to the last answer — English says to paragraph after “okay” as it is a thought of its own. (Some reporters do …