“Margie Rules” — The Subscription

Margie Wakeman Wells The Comma, The Dash, The Semicolon Leave a Comment

I have an excellent example this morning of what we do in Margie Rules. This is my $10-a-month subscription program. We offer a 10 percent discount on all my books and seminars; a live monthly session online for questions and discussion of English topics; and a dedicated FB page, where I answer questions and explain the grammar/punctuation that applies to …

“That Is…” and Others

Margie Wakeman Wells The Colon, The Comma, The Dash, The Semicolon Leave a Comment

This is an abbreviated version of what is in my book on these eight parentheticals. PARENTHETICAL TO INTRODUCE AN APPOSITIVE Sometimes, when a person wants to explain, reiterate, rename, or restate something — that is, he wants to use an appositive — he uses a parenthetical before the appositive. These are the expressions most commonly used as parentheticals before an …

More on the Word “So” — Even If We Don’t Even Want to Go There Again

Margie Wakeman Wells General, The Period, The Semicolon, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

Facebook had a couple of interesting questions/examples on “so.” SO I thought it would be good to take a look at them. This is my answer to the questions about the word “so” in the FB sentence below. …If, after a question has been posed to you, you have any question relating to what is being inquired about, please tell …

A Different Meaning for the Period or Semicolon Before “Is That Correct?”

Margie Wakeman Wells The Period, The Semicolon 3 Comments

Deciding to use a period versus a semicolon before “Is that correct?” and expecting your reader to distinguish that they mean something different is an exercise in extreme subtlety. This distinction has been pushed around out there for a long time. …You testified that he arrived at 9:00; is that correct? — meaning is it correct that you testified to this?  …You testified that he …

The Adverb That Gets Bumped up to Conjunction

Margie Wakeman Wells General, The Comma, The Semicolon 2 Comments

Sometimes an adverb gets pulled out to the beginning of a sentence to form a “bridge” to the sentence before it. It becomes a linking word for the two sentences and shows a relationship between the two sentences. This is called a conjunctive adverb. Some examples are however, moreover, nevertheless, therefore, still, thus, yet, then Generally there is a comma …

Parallel Construction and the Semicolon

Margie Wakeman Wells The Semicolon Leave a Comment

…I arrived on Saturday; he arrived on Sunday. …He resigned in 2010; she resigned in 2011. …The first train leaves at 5:00 A.M.; the last train leaves at 10:00 P.M. The Rule: When two sentences have NO conjunction between them and have parallel grammatical construction, use a semicolon between them. This question always arises: Could I use a period? My …