The Connecting Adverb

A “conjunctive adverb” is a word that is usually an adverb that has been pulled out to the front of the sentence to connect the sentence it is in to the one in front of it. It has a semicolon in front of it and a comma after it if it is more than one syllable. …He had been on …

Those “Conjunctive Adverbs” Again

When certain adverbs are pulled out to the front of a sentence and are used to form a bridge — that is, show a relationship — between two sentences, they become conjunctions which we call conjunctive adverbs. Some of them are moreover, however, nevertheless, therefore, consequently thus, hence, yet, still, then, so (Here is where I would make the argument …

Enter the Semicolon

We all know that a comma goes before a coordinate conjunction — and, but, or, nor — when there is an independent subject and verb after the conjunction. …I went with her, but I did not have the chance to speak with him. …She stopped at 1:00, and she saw that she was the only one working. Look at this …