Birthday Sale

  My birthday is next week. They are all big these days! To celebrate, we are having a book sale. Order from the bookstore on margieholdscourt.com. CR: Bad Grammar/Good Punctuation 10 percent off. Discount code: HBDMARGIECR Buy this text in combination with the Workbook or Word Pears, Pares, Pairs 15 percent off. Discount code: HBDMARGIECOMBO Hurry. The sale ends at midnight …

Word Pairs Is an E-Book

Over 2,000 word pairs with parts of speech, definitions, usage examples, and idioms – now just a click of the mouse away. Buy the word pairs book at margieholdscourt.com, and run it on any and all of your devices. Have it running in the background as you are editing so that you can quickly confirm whether it is “…has to …

The Word “Therefor”

This word — no e on the end — means “for that thing” and is always used when referring to having exchanged money or goods or property for something else. It often comes toward the end of the sentence. …I paid him $3,000 therefor. …She received a payment of $15,000 therefor. Check out my word pairs book! Happy punctuating! Margie

A Follow-Up! “Anytime” and “Any Time”

We had a discussion over on FB about this sentence: …Jump in anytime/any time you like. “Anytime” means “an indefinite point in time” as in a moment in time. …You can do that anytime. …I can meet you anytime tomorrow. “Any time” means “an indefinite period of time” as in a span of time. …I don’t have any time today. …

Some Thoughts for “Sometime” and “Some Time”

“Sometime” is an indefinite POINT in time; “some time” is an indefinite PERIOD of time. If you are thinking of “1:15” or “2:30,” it is one word; if you are thinking of “seven hours” or “ten minutes,” it is two words. …Give me a call sometime/some time next week. Are you thinking of giving him a call at 3:30 or …

Turn “Into”/”In to”

Just a reminder: We have an idiom turn into. It means “to become.” …When he drinks, he turns into a monster… …He turned into someone I don’t even recognize… Since this is true, we have to alter turn in to when it means to actually turn. …He turned in to the wrong roadway… …He turned in to the street from …

“Anymore” Versus “Any More”

Anymore, one word, means “no longer” or “from this time forward.” …will not do that anymore… …do not see him anymore… Any more, two words, means “any or anything additional.” …do not need any more to do… …does not have any more options… Happy punctuating! Margie

Everyone/Every One — Which to Choose?

The “one” words: No one is always two words. Everyone, anyone, someone are one word when they refer to a random person. (They are called “indefinite pronouns.”) …I need someone to help me. …They aren’t allowing anyone to enter the blockaded area. …Everyone was included in the invitation. These words are separate words when they refer to anything other than …

The Skinny on “Past” and “Passed”

Someone on FB asked about these. This is from my new book that is coming out this fall: Word Pares, Pears, Pairs. It will be some 3,000 pairs defined with examples. passed Past tense and past participle of to pass Always part of the verb VB: go by   …passed all but one car in the race… VB: distribute   …was passed …