That Pesky Word “So”

When so is said at the end of a thought, it seems to say “So that is my explanation; that is my reason.”

The word so can mean “for that reason” or “therefore” when it is used as a conjunction. In this case, at the end of a sentence that does not go on, so means “therefore.”

And when so is the last thing said, we view it as trailing off. Since it means “therefore,” there is a semicolon or period in front of it. It can be followed by a dash, indicating the sentence did not get finished, or ellipses

…I had contacted her and given her the data; so —
…I had contacted her and given her the data; so…

Happy punctuating!

Margie

Comments 6

  1. Do you place a comma after “so” when it is the first word of a sentence? Example, “So, you knew the defendant was in the house?”

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  2. What if the person says “So” at the beginning of every sentence? You wouldn’t put a semicolon before every “so”; right? You’d start some sentences with “So”; right?

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      Correct. If it is used at the beginning of every sentence, use a period in front of it.

      Have a good day.

      Margie

  3. Also, if a person says, “All right. So we’ve got that taken care of,” you always use a comma after “All right”; correct?

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