The Connecting Adverb

A “conjunctive adverb” is a word that is usually an adverb that has been pulled out to the front of the sentence to connect the sentence it is in to the one in front of it. It has a semicolon in front of it and a comma after it if it is more than one syllable.

…He had been on the job for over a year. He was therefore in a position to help her financially.
…He had been on the job for over a year; therefore, he was in a position to help her financially.

…She visited with her dad at home. She then went to the hospital to see her mom.
…She visited with her dad at home; then she went to the hospital to see her mom.

(A period isĀ  better in front of the conjunctive adverb when there are long and/or complicated sentences being joined.)

…We met to discuss the possibility of a merger on Friday, January 4, 2018. However, Adams, Jones, and Nelson had, I believe, talked ahead of time and had formulated a plan, a very complex plan, without our knowledge.

When the word that is trying to be a conjunctive adverb does not have an independent subject and verb after it, there is a comma in front of it and no other punctuation.

…We had spoken with him in person often that week; therefore, we did not feel the need to call.
…We had spoken with him in person often that week, therefore did not feel the need to call.

…I had checked with him several times; still I had the feeling something was amiss.
…I had checked with him several times, still had the feeling something was amiss.

Happy punctuating!

Margie

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